Man reveals how taking antidepressant drugs made him kill his own son

Thursday, July 27, 2017 by

If you know more than 10 people, you almost certainly know at least one person who is taking an antidepressant. A 2011 report by Harvard Health found that one in 10 Americans was taking an antidepressant, and among women in their 40s and 50s, that number escalated to an astounding 23 percent. While those statistics are alarming, it is almost certain that now, six years later, they are far worse. The fact is, Americans have been led to believe that antidepressants like serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a necessary and harmless crutch. The truth, however, is that not only do most of these people not need these dangerous drugs, but for the most part they don’t work, and they are known to cause very serious side effects.

This dangerous class of drugs has even turned normal, harmless people into killers.

The U.K.’s Daily Mail recently told the story of David Carmichael, a loving Canadian father who shot and killed his beloved 11-year-old son, Ian, during a psychotic break. While a judge found that Carmichael was “not criminally responsible on account of a mental disorder,” placing the blame on “major depression with psychotic episodes,” the father himself has insisted from the beginning that it was the SSRI paroxetine that was responsible for the terrible tragedy.

It is certainly hard to understand how depression alone could trigger Carmichael’s belief at the time that his family would appreciate his relieving them of the “intolerable” burden which Ian had become with his mild dyslexia and slight reading delay.

The fact is, although the drug company and medical professionals flatly deny the possibility that paroxetine could have caused this tragedy, the known side effects of SSRIs include drowsiness, insomnia, nausea, sexual side effects, anxiety, agitation, paranoid delusions and hallucinations.

And this is by no means an isolated incident. The website PharmaDeathClock.com, which keeps track of the number of victims killed by “Big Pharma’s chemical warfare on humanity” since the year 2000, shows that over 703,000 people have been killed by SSRIs during that time period.

Lennard J. Davis, writing for Psychology Today, points out that in spite of the hysterical excitement which met the release of SSRI drugs like Prozac in the early 1990s, the passage of time has proven that they are far less effective than initially believed. In fact, the promising studies released by the manufacturers of these drugs were often doctored to make them seem more effective than they truly are.

Davis points out several sound reasons to think very carefully before filling a script for an antidepressant:

  1. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found that they are no more effective in the treatment of depression than placebos for mild to moderate depression.
  2. A study by Columbia University and Johns Hopkins found that GPs routinely prescribe up to three SSRIs simultaneously, hoping to be lucky and hit on the right solution for a patient’s problem. Davis notes, “Doctors are in essence performing uncontrolled experiments on their patients, hoping that in some scattershot way they might hit on a solution.”
  3. Doctors are increasingly prescribing SSRIs to treat off-label “problems” like shyness, restlessness, sadness, high or low sex drive, shopping addiction and a host of other issues. No evidence exists that dangerous SSRIs with their host of side effects are even effective in the treatment of these so-called conditions.
  4. As a society, we are over-medicated and have been programmed to believe that “popping a pill” is the right solution to almost every condition, rather than getting to the root causes of our issues and resolving them.
  5. There is no scientific proof that depression can be treated by serotonin or that this condition is caused by a “chemical imbalance,” since doctors have no idea what levels of serotonin are “normal.” As Davis points out, while serotonin can make you feel happy, so can heroin, ecstasy and alcohol – and nobody would try to claim that they balance the chemicals in your brain!

Another issue that the mainstream media and Big Pharma do their utmost to cover up is the fact that psychiatric medications have been linked to multiple mass shootings across the globe. [Related: Discover the truth about the people pulling the triggers at Shootings.news.]

A 2012 article in World Net Daily (WND) pointed out that 90 percent of the school shootings that had taken place in the previous decade were directly linked to SSRIs.

British psychiatrist, Dr. David Healy, stressed at the time that, “[P]sychotropic drugs of pretty well any group can trigger violence up to and including homicide,” and that the common belief that it is the “illness and not the drugs” that causes violence is a dangerous misconception. [Related: Shootings in Germany and Alabama underscore violent side effects of psychiatric medications.]

If only David Carmichael’s doctor had given him all the information about the possible risks of paroxetine, perhaps his son Ian would be alive today. For the Carmichael family, that knowledge came too late.

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk

PharmaDeathClock.com

PsychologyToday.com

Health.Harvard.edu

WND.com



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